How FFPP Works by Virginia Bly Johnson

After more than a year of meetings and informal discussions among Al Weber and a few other photographers who shared his concern for what might happen to the archives of an aging population of career photographers, the Foundation for Photographic Preservation (FfPP) was organized as a non-profit California 501(c)(3) corporation in August 2006. The specific purpose of the corporation is to facilitate the preservation of the works of photographers, or of photographic collections, that have artistic, historical or social merit.

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Getting Started by Don Anderson

This page discusses defining the physical nature of a collection, makes suggestions about an inventory, and provides links to more detailed information about specific issues. In order to interest potential institutions in your collection, all parties need to know its content and condition. You could start with the provenance of what you have, how and why it exists, and who collected or compiled it. The collection must be surveyed and counted, making sure to register any identification and dating found on the negatives, prints, or other types of photographs.

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Notes from an Archivist: Finding a Home for Your Body of Work by April Halberstadt

As an archivist/curator, my job is two-fold. First, I have to make a recommendation to my Board about making room in my archive for donations and second, I have to find the time and money to organize the collection for storage and display.

I recently had the experience of placing the archive of my late father-in-law, M. H. Halberstadt in the archive of Special Collections at the University of California-Davis. It was an interesting exercise since I was on the other side of the exchange in this situation and I was trying to make our donation as attractive as possible. So I would like to share a few insights from my experiences as both an archivist and a donor.

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I’m Not Dead Yet! by Virginia Bly Johnson

In failing health and not sure what to do with his photographs, Oliver had started tossing them into the fireplace when he received Al’s call. Al was instrumental in placing the Crouch and Gagliani archives with the McHenry Library Special Collections unit at UC Santa Cruz.

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Reflections from the Trenches by Reverdy Johnson

Here are some of the lessons learned in the course of working with photographers and their estates for the placement of their archives over the past eight years.

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Estate Planning for Photographers by Reverdy Johnson

If you desire your archives to have a permanent home and not end up in someone’s attic, you need to do some prior planning. Specifically, you need to investigate who may be interested in acquiring your archives, or portions of them. Unless the acquirer is an institution that wants the “whole photographer” for teaching or research purposes, you may find that it makes sense to place different elements of your archives with different recipients. If you have work that has previously been acquired by museums or institutions, it may be appropriate to contact them and see what level of interest they may have in expanding their collections.

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Copyright Law Basics for Photography: United States Perspective by Nancy E. Wolff

The basis for copyright protection in the United States is the Copyright Act —Title 17 of the United States Code. Section 102 of the Act protects “original works of authorship” that are “fixed in a tangible medium.” Photographs and other forms of visual images are protected under Section 102(5) of the Act, which refers to “pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works.” A copyright holder in a photograph is afforded a package of exclusive rights under Section 106 including reproduction rights, adaptation (derivative) rights, distribution rights and public performance and display rights.

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FfPP Case Study: Morrie Camhi Archives by Virginia Bly Johnson

Morrie Camhi, a successful Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay area commercial photographer, was also a prolific writer and documentary photographer. ESPEJO: Reflections of the Mexican American, perhaps his best known project, was a deep survey of the Mexican-American people and culture which Morrie organized, directed and worked on with six other photographers. The project evolved out of Morrie’s earlier work documenting the demonstrations and strike actions of the United Farm Worker movement in California, and culminated in exhibitions at the Center for Contemporary Art in Chicago and the Oakland Museum.

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Ray McSavaney’s Archive by Janet Schipper

When Ray McSavaney passed away in July 2014, he left a considerable photographic legacy. He had been one of the founders of the Owens Valley Photographic Workshops and was a highly respected teacher. He had self published “Explorations”, which represents a fine selection of his images and reveals his talents as a writer. His photographs had been exhibited and collected by individuals and institutions, including the Huntington Library in San Marino, California.

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The Jerry Lebeck Collection by Chase Weaver

After his death in March 2009, his widow Barbara Lebeck, called Al Weber asking for suggestions about what could be done with Jerry’s extensive body of photographs, made both as a student and professional photographer, dating from the 1950s to the 2000s.

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John Scarlata—A Case Study by Ben Garfinkle

John taught photography for 30 years. He also amassed a personal body of work with camera formats from the ubiquitous 35mm up to 7” x 17” view cameras. His collection of photographs was made using a wide variety of alternative processes as well as traditional silver and digital prints. He also did his own color printing.

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Don Abelson by Ron Rigge

In his later years, Don was an early & enthusiastic convert to digital photography. He digitized many of his negatives, older & more recent ones alike, and with a dedicated printer, he learned to make ink prints that were indistinguishable from his early silver prints.

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